Perhaps no writer’s trajectory more aptly reflects the dramatic events in 20th-century East-Central Europe than the literary career of Polish Nobel Laureate Czesław Miłosz. His biography encompasses almost a whole centenary: as a witness of both World Wars, the Russian Revolution and the Holocaust, Miłosz experienced first hand some of the most tragic calamities of our times and survived the ravages of several totalitarian regimes. Not surprisingly, after Miłosz ended up in exile in the early 1950s, one of the primary concerns of his writings became to diagnose the forces that have shaped post-Enlightenment Europe and its ideological offshoots throughout the 20th century.


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Van Heuckelom, Kris. "Czesław Miłosz". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 09 October 2011
[, accessed 09 October 2015.]

Related Groups

  1. World War 2 Literature
  2. Catholic literature
  3. Nobel Prize-winners
  4. Communism and Dissent in Central and Eastern Europe