Alan Duff (2072 words)

  • Otto Heim (University of Hong Kong)
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Alan Duff’s emergence on the New Zealand literary landscape in 1990 has been likened to the bursting of a volcano. His first novel, Once Were Warriors, immediately established him as one of New Zealand’s most controversial writers both on account of his head-on attack on cultural sensitivities and the sheer muscle of his language. Arriving on the back of a Maori Renaissance, Duff vehemently berated his people for failing to adapt to the standards of modernity 150 years of colonisation had established in New Zealand. Duff is a writer with a mission and each of his (to date) seven books of fiction reiterates a firmly held position and challenges opposition, while his writing at the same time relentlessly flaunts the anger, h…

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Citation:
Heim, Otto. "Alan Duff". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 08 August 2005
[https://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=5954, accessed 23 September 2017.]

Articles on Duff's works

  1. Both Sides of the Moon
  2. Once Were Warriors
  3. What Becomes of the Broken Hearted?

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