Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (2059 words)

Historical Context Essay

On 22 October 1685, the Parlement of Paris registers the decree of King Louis XIV – the Edict of Fontainebleau – that effectively puts an end to the legitimate, though limited, existence of Reformed subjects in his kingdom, which was granted in 1598 by King Henry IV in the so-called Edict of Nantes.

Historical background

While the followers of the Genevan reformer John Calvin (1509-1564) were usually called Calvinists, in France they were also known as “Huguenots”. In use ever since the mid-sixteenth century, the origin of the name Huguenot remains unknown, although various theories suggest that it may have been derived from the German word Eidgenossen, a t…

We have have no profile for this entry. If you are a qualified scholar and you wish to write for The Literary Encyclopedia, please click here to contact us.

Citation:
Green, Michaël. "Revocation of the Edict of Nantes". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 10 January 2017
[https://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=19490, accessed 21 October 2018.]


Save this article

If you need to create a new bookshelf to save this article in, please make sure that you are logged in, then go to your 'Account' here.