William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar

Kenneth Parker (University of East London); Revised By: Virginia Mason Vaughan (Clark University)
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The more or less agreed order of composition of the plays shows

Julius Caesar

coming after

Henry V

. Since the latter might be seen as the culmination of a process that had begun with

The First Part of the Contention of the Two Famous Houses of York and Lancaster

(

2 Henry VI

), continuing via

Richard III

,

Richard II

,

King John

and the two parts of

Henry IV

,

Julius Caesar

might be seen as Shakespeare's move from English to Roman history - an interest manifested earlier in

Titus Andronicus

, first printed in 1594, and the poem

The Rape of Lucrece

, entered into the Stationers' Register on 9th May of the same year.

English popular interest in Roman history was immense. Not only were there key translations before 1600 (Herodian 1550; Eutropius 1564; Appian 1578), but Philip Henslowe's Diary lists

2930 words

Citation: Parker, Kenneth, Virginia Mason Vaughan. "Julius Caesar". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 28 October 2000; last revised 20 January 2020. [https://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=4303, accessed 26 May 2024.]

4303 Julius Caesar 3 Historical context notes are intended to give basic and preliminary information on a topic. In some cases they will be expanded into longer entries as the Literary Encyclopedia evolves.

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